Home Concepts Decison Making & Problem Solving Possibility Addiction Disorder: Coaching and What Lies Beneath

Possibility Addiction Disorder: Coaching and What Lies Beneath

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Philip had explanations for this.

“I will find the right possibility someday.”

“The half life of a possibility is six hours.”

“I’m not an implementation guy.”

“Actually doing things is someone else’s job.”

“Practical work isn’t noble.”

“Great People like Leonardo DaVinci and Frank Lloyd Wright died with hundreds of     incomplete projects”.

“If only other people were more like me, things would be better.

No Explanation helped.

A few days ago, Philip had a medical appointment. The doctor told him that he was probably fine, but the tests would tell. On the ride home, he saw, in an instant that his life would really end…. sooner or later.

It was time for something new, really new, really not just another way to keep the same game going. Philip hit rock bottom.

But, maybe there were questions that he hadn’t asked?

……A voice in his head responded at once.

What’s important enough for you to take on your Possibility Addiction seriously?

What practices would you have to do faithfully to change your way of operating from Possibility to Choice?

What would guarantee that you sustain these practices?

Is all of this trying to fulfill some singular possibility inside yourself that never gets satisfied.

What would coaching in a Possibility Addiction Rehab look like?

Everything he then thought of seemed more of the same and wouldn’t work because he was once a Possibility Addict, always a Possibility Addict.

The best he had could find no answer, and the inevitable trail preceded him.

Charles E. Smith Ph.D. Copyright@April 2012

 

 

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