Home Research Neurosciences: Brain & Behavior Neuroscience Research Survey: Summary of Findings

Neuroscience Research Survey: Summary of Findings

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Listing of items independent of the findings that were chosen by respondents 50-59%, 60-69% or more than 70% of the time.

50-59%
Suggests that executive coaches should promote mindfulness and meditation practices among their clients.
Suggests that executive coaches should be reading more about stress (for example, Robert Sapolsky’s Why Zebras Don’t Get Ulcers) and bring resulting insights into their coaching sessions.
Suggests that executive coaches should devote more attention in their coaching to Decision-Making processes and attention to risk-related addictive behavior in their client.
Suggests that executive coaches should read more about behavioral economics (such as work of Daniel Kahneman) and the psychology of decision-making and risk and bring the resulting insights into their coaching sessions.
Suggests that executive coaches should become more knowledgeable about a biopsychosocial perspective on risk-taking behavior—enabling the coach to explore the biological, psychological and sociological elements of risky behavior in their own life and work, as well as that of their clients.
Suggests that executive coaches should frequently return to a review of fundamental principles in the field of executive coaching regarding advice giving.
Suggests that executive coaches should always follow any advice that they give with inquiry—encouraging their clients to explore both the strengths and weaknesses of the advice that is given.
Suggests that executive coaches should increase their sensitivity to ways in which their own personal desire for bonding and nurturing are influencing their own work as a coach.
Suggests that executive coaches should read about neuro-social biology (such as found in Robert Sapolsky’s Behavior) and apply insights from this work in their coaching sessions.
Suggests that executive coaches should devote more attention in their coaching to the somatic (bodily) experiences of their client: how are they “feeling”, where does this “feeling” come from in their body, and what is the impact of this feeling.

Comments made by presenter:
stress and risk management are important issues to be addressed by executive coaching.
All three levels of psychological functioning should be addressed in executive coaching: cognition (thinking), affect (feeling) and conation (behaving). These levels should be addressed within the context of a biopsychosocial perspective.
It is important to go back to basics when engaging in executive coaching (to avoid advice giving). It is also important to move forward by engaging in Argyris and Schon’s advice accompanied by inquiry, and to move forward with greater self-awareness.
As executive coaches we must gain a deeper understanding of the biopsychosocial foundation of “feelings” (both neural and hormonal dynamics)

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