Home Concepts Ethics Coaching for The Greater Good

Coaching for The Greater Good

13 min read
0
0
27

Generative coaches were identified by each of us as editors and were all interviewed by one of us [WB]. Each interview was conducted and recorded via Zoom. The recording was then transferred to Vimeo and posted in the Library of Professional Coaching along with written summaries of major themes introduced during the interview. This new medium of documentation will be commonly used in future issues of The Future of Coaching, as well as in other documents published in LPC. Our world is moving into a new era of digitally based publications, and those who are curating LPC are pleased to be among the first taking advantage of the opportunities afforded by this new mode of publication.

We invite you to read the excellent articles contained in this issue and to view the insightful interviews. Here is a brief description of and links to each document.

_______________

The first two documents are essays written specifically for this publication by both of the editors.

William Bergquist: Generativity and the Greater Good: The Life and Work of Two Professional Coaches

Generativity can be a source of inspiration and motivation for those of us serving as professional coaches who wish to engage in work on behalf of the Greater Good in their local community, their nation, their environment –and ultimately their world. It is to the theme of Generativity that I turn in this essay and it is to the work and life of two men—Lee Salmon and Rey Carr==that I turn to exemplify the ways in which generativity (in four roles) shows up in the engagement of coaching for the Greater Good.

Renee Freedman: Coaching as a Conduit for the Greater Good

It can be said that the theme of ‘coaching for the greater good’ is an oxymoron. The basic purpose of coaching is to support the growth and development of an individual human being or a set of human beings (often referred to as a team).  The type of growth sought is almost always perceived as a potential source for a positive outcome. Thus, ‘coaching for the greater good’ is naturally implicit in the basic act of coaching. Although quantitative results such as finite achievements and measured outcomes are often requested, coaching is mostly qualitative in nature. There are four qualitative experiences for which coaching is a beacon.

______________

Pages 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1K Club
Load More Related Articles
Load More By Renee Freedman
Load More In Ethics

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Check Also

Generativity and the Greater Good: The Life and Work of Two Professional Coaches

Generativity can be a source of inspiration and motivation for those of us serving as prof…